Coach Of The Year

[wpramazon asin=”B000HSIFHU” keyword=”oscar”] [wpramazon asin=”B00S71R8UY” keyword=”oscar”]
Terence Gavish

6 comments

  • Ted McCarron 2 years ago
    5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
    2.0 out of 5 stars
    A moderately entertaining drama, February 22, 2001
    By 
    Ted McCarron (DeKalb, IL United States) –

    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Coach of the Year [VHS] (VHS Tape)
    I have to admit I have very personal reasons for having purchased several copies of this 1980 made for T.V. movie; my family and I were extras in the football audiance! I was 15 at the time and it was being filmed in Mooseheart, Illinois (between Aurora and Batavia. Yes, Mooseheart is the villiage for orphans and other disadvantaged children of Moose club members (I lived there for six months when I was in third grade). The highlight for my family was the scene of the black woman and white man together in the audiance watching the game. You could see the top of my sister Noel’s head sitting right below them (she was 12 at the time). I sent a copy to family members for Christmas.
    Now, about the movie itself. It was about what you’d expect from a “made for TV” movie. It was somewhat hokie at times, but still a fairly interesting drama. Robert Conrad plays a coach who’s frustrated by his inabilty to walk as a result of a Vietnam War injury. Turned down from coaching the Chicago Bears (talk about shooting for the stars!) he reluctantly takes up a “temporary” coaching position at the youth reform school at St. Charles, Illinois (filmed on location) as a way of keeping his eye on his recently incarcerated nephew. In the process he turns a motley bunch of unruly youths into a formidable football team. The highlight of the movie comes when the team is allowed to play an elite prep school outside the reformatory grounds.
    The drama is good but not spectacular. Nevertheless, it’s worth watching at least once. One has to chuckle when reminded of the datedness of the movie at the end. As the youths get ready to return back to the reform school, a naive cheerleader asks one of the boys to go out with her next weekend. When he says he won’t be available for awhile, she asks “when?”, and he replies “1982.” (Wow, that far into the future?!) If you have any further questions about the movie, email me at tedmccarron@yahoo.com.

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  • David L. Millard 2 years ago
    2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
    2.0 out of 5 stars
    You get what you pay for…, November 6, 2001
    By A Customer
    This review is from: Coach Of the Year (DVD)
    This is a budget price DVD and the print is no better than what you would record off television. Get it only if you’re a fan of Robert Conrad or Erin Gray. The print is terrible.

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  • 2 years ago
    1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Well Worth the Price!, May 18, 2013
    By 

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    It has been a lot of years since I have seen Coach of The Year with Robert Conrad. I remember it as being a Tuesday Movie of the Week originally. Anyway, this movie is inexpensive to purchase & well worth the price. Conrad in inspiring in his performance as a wheelchair bound Vietnam vet who made a difference in the lives of juveniles by giving them a reason to try & to care. You won’t be disappointed if your looking for a good & inspiring film.

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  • Sheryl Fechter 2 years ago
    22 of 25 people found the following review helpful
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    “I Wanna Go To The Top Of The Empire State Building, But …” – James Forester, February 19, 2015
    By 
    Sheryl Fechter (Northern Illinois, United States) –

    This review is from: Song One (DVD)
    Franny (Anne Hathaway) is called to come home quickly while working in Morocco on her Ph.D. Her brother, Henry (Ben Rosenfield) is hit by a car right away as the film opens. He is a street musician that idolizes the Brooklyn, New York indie circuit and one singer, in particular. Their mother, Karen (Mary Steenburgen), is distraught and knows the two of them have not spoken to each other in half a year. An argument separated the once-close siblings and now there are no words for Franny to say – or are there?

    Writer and director, Kate Barker-Froyland puts together a way of communication between a family with the son in a coma. They together fill the room with sounds. Franny while filled with remorse over having her last words to her brother be that of discontent arranges ways of almost constant talking through different venues. I thought she was very clever and astute finding ways to get through to her brother in various ways besides just her own voice. While first going to his loft, she finds a book of different writings he has done; songs, thoughts, favorites, etc. She immediately begins to collect the things he loves and brings them to him. One, in particular, that handed me a smile was when she simply ripped open a bag of his favorite candy (M & Ms) and poured them into her hand while putting it up to his ear and nose. This because of a birthday that he would remember as a child. There are many things along these lines that she does for him to bring the sounds and smells of the things he loves. But most of all, she tracks down his favorite musician, James Forester (Johnny Flynn). He adores his talent and his music.

    As James enters the story, Franny is eager for him to sing so she might record and play him back to Henry. If he is his favorite, then Franny is going to go up and beyond the call. These two begin a friendship which quickly sparks their romantic chemistry. The ways of communicating in this romance between Hathaway and Flynn, then with Hathaway engaging with her brother, were so heartfelt. Anne Hathaway has the ability in this film, and with many of her other projects, to speak volumes with her eyes in lieu of the most detailed of wording. Here is no exception, Hathaway beams her emotions and they are easily read and felt. I felt she portrayed her part as Franny, the loving sister, so well with slight conversation and it certainly did pull at me also while with James. The cast was convincing in this film. Mary Steenburgen being a little less constrained as some of her other roles. I definitely could feel a mother’s deep grief and also a different way of carrying herself with the part of the mother who had known the music scene in her day too. Anne Hathaway was perfect for a role that didn’t need fluid verbal conversation constantly, she divulges so much with her eyes. James Flynn carried himself as a musician still well known but possibly struggling for more.

    The song choices (Jenny Lewis, Jonathan Rice, Nate Walcott) were interesting and well thought out for such a family dilemma and for a performance artist in his venues and all of the other musicians also. I listened to all of them through the end credits. It is also shot throughout the late night clubs of New York which gives a balance to the hospital’s sadness and then to the hopeful feel of the nightlife. This is more of a gently nuanced film full of subtleties and soft-spoken feelings. If this is not the kind of portrayal that you may be seeking, you may be split on how you enjoy the film. It can be seen where this film could polarize an audience depending on what you are expecting. Much of the film is nonverbal along with its intention except for the songs that seem, at times, to happily fill in this film’s storyline.

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  • Writer in Residence 2 years ago
    30 of 36 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    A Moving & Emotional Gem, January 27, 2015
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    This review is from: Song One (Amazon Instant Video)
    This beautiful, quiet and moving film hits just the right note. Hathaway shines as a sister concerned for her brother’s health and real-life musician, Johnny Flynn’s understated, James, is riveting. I could not take my eyes off either of them and the story they told with their faces and their eyes. The premise of this film is fresh and believable – it is a story that could happen to anyone and is sure to capture what moves and stirs human beings when faced with the difficulties and joys of life. Don’t miss it.

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  • Wise Young 2 years ago
    16 of 20 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    A wonderful story of the love a sister has for a brother, June 25, 2015
    By 
    Wise Young (New York, NY USA) –

    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Song One (Amazon Instant Video)
    Song One

    Democracy is not a particularly good way to grade art, books, and movies. It always surprises me how mediocre many five-star movies are and how great some 3-star movies are. Song One is a movie that has a story that tugs hard on your heart strings, had superb acting that showed the depth of anguish and love of a young woman for her head-injured brother, and a remarkably authentic depiction of the indie music scene in Brooklyn. It is almost everything a good movie should be, a love story that felt real and not maudlin, a view of a life and culture of a vibrant Indie music scene in Brooklyn, and three actors who gave probably the best performances of their lives.

    Anne Hathaway plays Franny, a young 20-something anthropologist in training, who learns that her musician brother had suffered head injury and rushes back to New York to find him comatose and unresponsive in hospital. She had a fight with him 6 months previously over his dropping out of college to play music and did not listen to his music and CDs that he sent to her. In my opinion, it was Anne Hathaways best performance in a move to date, done with great sensitivity, passion, and authenticity.

    Johnny Flynn, who played musician James Forester, is not only a very good guitar player and singer but fit so perfectly into the role of a singer/writer that it is hard to imagine him as something else. His British accent came through and it is not surprising to find that he is actually a South African born English musician and actor who is the frontman of the folk-rock band Johnny Flynn & The Sussex Wit and has a role in the TV series Scrotal Wit. He and Anne Hathaway pulled off several difficult scenes that were combination conversations and songs. She has a sweet voice.

    Ben Rosen played brother Henry before and after becoming comatose is a very believable starting musician playing in the subway. The whole issue of head injury, the fact that comatose people often can hear, and the timing of the awakening is very consistent with head injuries. The only thing that did not work well is the presence of the oral tracheal tube for respiration. More important, a person with a tracheal tube would be unable to talk, would have show more respiratory movement, and probably would have been fighting the ventilator.

    The music scenes in Brooklyn appeared to be real. The music varied in quality but this is the way Indie music is. When James Forester told Franny that he was playing several shows in New York, a wedding, and a final show in Philadelphia, Franny did not understand and asked who was getting married and Forester said that he did not know because he was just the entertainment and he earned $10,000 to play three songs. There was a dancing scene was well done and captured both the feeling and sound well.

    In the end, this was not a love story between Franny and James although they may eventually love each other. This is really the story of the non-romantic love of a sister for a brother. Franny sought to capture those sounds and smells that would be meaningful to her comatose brother. She read through his notes, found out that James Forester was Henry’s favorite singer, and used internet to find and play music from James Forester to her brother. Of course, James played at Henry’s bedside. The movie could have descended into something less than credible if it had tried to portray the relationship between Franny and James as love.

    The movie was well-written with realistic dialog that tied the details of the story together. The music was enjoyable, the acting was superb, and the action well-paced so that I did not get bored at any time during the 1 hours 26 minute movie. It deserves more than 3 stars, which is what many critics gave. In my opinion, this was one of the best movies of 2014 and I am glad that I watched it. I decided to buy a copy so that I can watch it again on my iPad when in a place without Internet. Given the limited storage of an iPad, I keep no more than 20 movies on it. Song One is one of these movies.

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